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The Huseby Journal

New York Times calls FX, ESPN O.J. Simpson episodes 'astonishing.' So was being there in person

Some celebrity trials are relegated to the dustbins of history. Who remembers, for example, the Lindbergh baby kidnapping trial? Or the three trials of silent-film star Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle? The scandalous custody trial of pre-teen Gloria Vanderbilt?

Not many of us. The same thing was happening with the O.J. Simpson case that Huseby worked 20 years ago. We remember it well, of course, but if you ask most millennials about it, they might know a few things but not many details.

(Huseby handled every piece of information exhibited in the civil trial, and also did work with the criminal trial, helping the court reporter market the trial transcripts. See details, below.)

Then came television to bring those memories roaring back. And roar they did, because of the effectiveness of the presentations of the two programs that The New York Times calls “astonishing.”


When “Made in America” was scheduled scant months away from FX’s “The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” it sounded like overkill. Instead, the pairing established the Simpson story as the kind of historical episode that only reveals more when viewed from additional angles. (New York Times)

Click here to access all parts of the ESPN/ABC series.


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Huseby was on hand for O.J. Simpson's civil and criminal trials, working with electronic transcripts and evidence

Huseby, Inc., was involved in another famous trial you might have heard of involving O.J. Simpson.

AP photographer Harry Scull Jr. took pictures of Simpson wearing shoes tied to the murder.

Huseby handled every piece of information exhibited in the civil trial, and also did work with the criminal trial, helping the court reporter market the trial transcripts.

“I was working directly with (Simpson defense attorney) Johnny Cochran and (deputy DA/prosecutor) Marsha Clark,” said Scott Huseby, CEO of Huseby, Inc. “They were getting daily transcripts from me. I’d stay up all night and fill orders for all the media. Anyone could come and order. Judge (Lance) Ito ordered a CD rom from me directly.”

One example of evidence used to tie Simpson to the murders was bloody footprints that were identified as being from a particular brand of shoes.

An FBI agent and expert on shoe-print impressions, testified that the prints were left by Bruno Magli Lorenzo-style shoes, according to the Marshall University Forensic Science Center website.

Simpson denied ever owning a pair, but on Sept. 26, 1993, Associated Press photographer Harry Scull Jr. took pictures of Simpson wearing the shoes at Rich Stadium (now Ralph Wilson Stadium) in New York. Huseby handled that bit of evidence, too.

While Huseby, Inc., now focuses more on its court reporting endeavors than software development, the software Huseby used for electronic transcripts during the Simpson trial has evolved into Etranscript, the standard in the industry.

To schedule transcription services or any Huseby service in any location, go toHuseby.com or call: 1-800-333-2082.

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O.J. Simpson trial is one of many things this court reporter has in common with our court reporters

AP logoHere’s a very interesting story about a court reporter who is retiring after a 48-year career. It begins like this:

During jury selection for the O.J. Simpson trial, Linda Deutsch was named the pool reporter and went on TV every day to explain what had happened. . . . Indeed, for the last near half century, Linda Deutsch has been the most trusted voice in court journalism.

Wait a minute, you might be thinking, that’s the wrong kind of court reporter.

And you’d be right. But while it’s not the kind of court reporter we are at Huseby Global Litigation services, this journalistic court reporter does have some things in common with a stenographic court reporter.

Here’s one:

Leaving the cases in the courtroom and being able to joke with other reporters helped her keep her sanity during some of the more disturbing cases she covered.

We’ve certainly had that experience. We also had the experience of working the O.J. Simpson trial. Huseby handled every piece of information exhibited in the civil trial, and also did work with the criminal trial, helping the court reporter market the trial transcripts.

Here's another way:

"She's just extremely ethical, extremely professional and very, very honest," said high-profile defense attorney Thomas Mesereau,

And like Ms. Deutsch in her industry, Huseby court reporters are among the most trusted in our industry.

To learn more about Huseby’s litigation services, including court reporting, Web conferencing, video conferencing, video depositions, and more, call a Huseby scheduler and ask. We have more than 4,000 conference room suites worldwide ready for you to use today. 800-333-2082.

To learn more about Linda Deutsch’s fabulous career, read the San Francisco Public Radio story here.

Or, read the Associated Press story via The New York Times here.

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