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The Huseby Journal

5 Things They Don’t Teach You in Court Reporting School

This week, we spoke with one of our seasoned court reporters, Andrea Nobrega. Andrea filled us in on a few things that come with court reporting that she did not learn in court reporting school.

Read on for 5 things they don’t teach you in court reporting school.

1.     The unpredictability of the length of each job. There is no way to know how long a job will go. There is always a chance that the attorneys will want to finish the deposition quickly, and this can mean late hours for the court reporter. The unpredictability of the length of each job can be difficult if you have other responsibilities. If you have kids, it would be a good idea to get to know a reliable babysitter before becoming a court reporter.

2.     Flexible schedule. The flexibility of this career is one of the greatest benefits. You are able to pick and choose which jobs you work, making it easy to take time off.

3.     Speak up, if a witness or attorney is speaking too quickly. As a court reporter, you are sure to experience speedy talkers, whether it be witnesses or attorneys. Rather than stay quiet and risk the accuracy of the transcript, it is best to speak up to the speedy talkers and politely ask that they slow down.

4.     Time management skills go a long way in this career. Procrastination is your enemy, especially when it comes to editing a transcript. If you do your own scoping, it will be worth it to stay on top of all editing ahead of time.

5.     Foreign accents are hard to transcribe. A common struggle among court reporters, is attempting to understand foreign accents during a deposition. It can be helpful to remind the person with the accent to slow it down, but this obstacle will become easier to overcome as you gain experience.