Florida Court reporter finds herself in middle of conflict between board, supervisor

stenographCourt reporters are usually indispensable contributors to our government and legal systems.

Their work is usually greatly appreciated, at best. At worst, they’re overlooked while they carry on their important work.

But have you ever been in a situation like this?

In Palm Coast, Florida, canvassing board members arrived at their Wednesday morning meeting to find a court reporter there to transcribe the meeting’s proceedings, according to the Palm Coast Observer.

The court reporter, Mary Graybosch, was hired after an Oct. 24 meeting in which the election supervisor wrangled with the other board members over meeting minutes and how they were recorded. The supervisor had used her iPhone to record them at the previous meeting.

The Observer quoted the elections supervisor as saying:

“As supervisor of elections, I’ve always done the minutes, I’m going to continue to do the minutes; I don’t need anybody doing the minutes for me. I won’t have another county office doing the minutes for this office that I am responsible for, so I reject these minutes.”

The supervisor suggested the board hire a court reporter to transcribe meetings verbatim, the paper reported, but no one replied to the suggestion during the meeting and there was no formal action on the request.

Upon seeing the reporter at the meeting, a board member asked who was paying for the reporter? The election supervisor said it was coming out of her budget.

Read more.

Huseby court reporters
While we hope you’re never in this sort of situation, no matter what your needs, Huseby offices offer litigation services, including court reporting, Web conferencing, video conferencing, video depositions, and more.

Call a Huseby scheduler and ask. We have more than 4,000 conference room suites worldwide ready for you to use today. 800-333-2082.

 

No offense taken: John Oliver acknowledges role of court reporter in animal Supreme Court video

In John Oliver's Supreme Court sendup, a chicken portrays the court reporter.

In John Oliver’s Supreme Court sendup, a chicken portrays the court reporter.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal to allow camera’s in the courtroom has prompted a viral video that features stand-ins for the justices and other court officials — including a chicken portraying a court reporter.

As Reuters news service points out, the video has received more than 2 million views on YouTube. While lots of viewers are enamored with the bulldog that plays Antonin Scalia and the poodle portraying Samuel Alito, we’re mostly taken by the hen that pecks away at a court reporter’s keyboard.

In the viral video, they reenact Holt vs. Hobbs, which is about whether a prison can require a Muslim inmate to trim his beard for security reasons. As promised, it’s much more entertaining than audio Supreme Court arguments or artist’s sketches of the court in action.

It’s unclear whether any of the justices have seen the comedy clip, Reuters quotes court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg as saying.

Read more.

 

Investigative team lead by dogged attorney uncovers depth of scandal at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

The venerable Old Well at UNC-Chapel Hill. Photo by  Zhang via Flickr Creative Commons.

The venerable Old Well at UNC-Chapel Hill. Photo by Zhang via Flickr Creative Commons.

IF you live in North Carolina or follow college sports, you’ve probably heard about the results of The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill’s independent investigation into academic and athletic fraud at the university.

In a damning report, Kenneth Wainstein’s team of investigators found 3,100 students took bogus classes — about 50 percent of them athletes — from 1993 to 2011.

How did UNC get here? After years of denials and evasions, the university realized the story was not going to die unless it dealt with the issues head on, so UNC administrators hired attorney Wainstein to look deeply into the matter. As a result of his investigation, four UNC staff members have been fired, five are under review, and a report has been sent to the NCAA, which will possibly result in athletic sanctions against UNC.

For years, UNC has dragged its feet in response to open-records request from The News & Observer of Raleigh, which broke the first stories of the scandal and has been doggedly pursuing it ever since. One earlier internal look into the scandal lead by former North Carolina Gov. Jim Hunt determined the scandal wasn’t an athletic one, but an academic one, since students other than athletes were enrolled in the classes.

As the N&O pointed out, that conclusion ignores the fact that 50 percent of students enrolled in the classes were athletes (the majority of which were football players), although athletes only make up a fraction of the student body as a whole.

Read more.

A dogged attorney
Wainstein, with the firm Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP, is a  former U.S. Justice  Department attorney and homeland security adviser.

He explained his role and his relationship with UNC to Bloomberg News like this:

“I do independent investigations for a living and I can tell you that whenever you’re dealing with an organization, be it a corporation or a school or an association, it’s a difficult decision to ask an outsider to come in and look around your business and find the faults.”

He and his team consulted with state prosecutors and the FBI and “received the fruits of their criminal investigation,” Bloomberg reported.

Read more.

Huseby in North Carolina
Huseby offices offer litigation services, including court reporting, Web conferencing, video conferencing, video depositions, and more. Our offices North Carolina are at this location:

1 West Pack Square #1400
Asheville, NC 28801
(704) 253-7033

200 West Second Street, 19th Floor
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
(800) 333-2082

1230 West Morehead Street #408
Charlotte, NC 28208
(800) 333-2082

7800 Airport Center Drive #401
Greensboro, NC 27409
(336) 605-9669

3737 Glenwood Avenue
#100  Raleigh, NC 27612
(919) 831-8877

Looking for help in a different city? Call a Huseby scheduler and ask. We have more than 4,000 conference room suites worldwide ready for you to use today. 800-333-2082.

 

In Sacramento, California, mid-sized law firms seek lateral hires; biotech firm is target of legal investigations

California state capitol building in Sacramento. Photo via Flickr Creative Commons.

California state capitol building in Sacramento. Photo via Flickr Creative Commons.

In Sacramento, California, experienced lawyers are more likely to leave a firm to start their own boutique practices than bounce to other established firms, according to a story in the Sacramento Business Journal.

That makes them hot commodities in Sacramento, sought by mid-sized law firms looking to hire attorneys who will bring their business with them, the story says.

And while some firms mentioned in the story have made lateral hires recently, there are not a lot of opportunities for that trend to expand, the story says.

Read more to see which firms have successfully made lateral hires.

Law firms investigate biotech firm
Sacramento-area biotech firm Marrone Bio Innovations Inc. has announced it is laying off 23 percent of its staff just a month after at least 16 law firms began investigations into its finances, according to news reports.

The company employed 154 workers as of March 31, according to The Sacramento Bee, which reported “barely a year ago, Marrone Bio was the toast of the greater Sacramento tech sector.”

The investigation announcements by law firms from all over the country began soon after Marrone Bio reported it was performing an internal audit of its financial reports, the Sacramento Business Journal reports.

Read more.

DeMichelle-Huseby is headquartered in Fairfield, California, with offices in Napa, Dixon, Sacramento and San Rafael.

Legal professionals looking to schedule litigation services or order transcripts in Sacramento and other California locations can contact Shanna DeMichelle-Zanone or Tabitha Stewart  at 888-709-0888 or click here to schedule.

Here are all of Huseby’s California locations.

West regional center
South Flower Street
Los Angeles, CA 90071
(213) 234-5540

Dixon Professional Building
255 N. Lincoln Street, Suite H
Dixon, CA 95620

700 Webster Street
Fairfield, CA 94533

7815 North Palm Avenue, Suite 120 Fresno , CA 93711

DeMichelle-Huseby
1034 Walnut Street
Napa , CA 94558

3550 Watt Avenue
Sacramento , CA 95821

1919 Grand Avenue,
Suite 1F San Diego , CA 92109

505 Montgomery Street
10th & 11th Floors San Francisco , CA 94111 (415) 432-6051

4340 Redwood Highway, Suite F-150 San Rafael , CA 94903

Click here for all of Huseby’s locations nationwide.

 

Court reporting roundup: New Jersey student contributes to book, California jobs picture strong, New Jersey ex-reporter fights cancer

stenographA story in NJ.com features court reporting student Maria Rose Breien who is a contributor to the recently released book “Court Reporter Survival Guide: School Success Stories.”

The book is a collection of essays and tips about making it through court reporting school written by freelancers, officials, CART captioners and current students.

“Having an amazing support system while going through your court reporting training is integral to a student’s success,” Breien is quoted as saying. She’s enrolled as a student with the iReporting Institute.

Read more.

Good economic news
In a report on the fall of the U.S. unemployment rate to 5.9 percent, its lowest level in more than six years, the San Gabriel Valley Tribune focuses on a particularly bright spot in that bright news: Court reporting.

Although people might not be aware of court reporting as a career, it will be “ramping up locally over the next few years” the story says.

It then quotes the 2013-14 Court Reporting Industry Outlook Report which predicts that by 2018, there will be 5,500 new court reporter jobs available in the U.S., with 2,320 of those openings in California.

“Projected shortages in the stenographic court reporting profession come at a time when many graduates with traditional four-year degrees are struggling to find employment,” Jim Cudahy, executive director of the National Court Reporters Association, is quoted as saying. “Court reporting is a career path with above average job security and earning potential as compared to its more traditional counterparts. With opportunities for court reporters on the rise, students who graduate will hold more than a piece of paper — they’ll hold a job.”

Read more.

Court reporter fights cancer
A court reporter’s bout with breast cancer is the focus of an Asbury Park Press story, which recently profiled Gail Coulter who received her diagnosis as she approached her 30th year as a court stenographer.

The diagnosis of early stage II breast cancer shocked her, the story said. She never detected a lump or experienced any other symptoms of the disease, but the disease does run in her family.

Resolved to beat the disease, she began a long treatment process during which she made a career change from her job as court reporter.

Her reasons for the change were both personal and professional, and led her to a new career in the restaurant business. She’s had clean checkups since ending chemotherapy.

Read more.

Huseby celebrates the work of court reporters across the country.
logoHuseby hires only the very best reporters. Each reporter is screened before hiring to ensure his or her work meets the company’s high standards. When a reporter wishes to work for Huseby, an account executive follows a stringent reporter review process.

Click here to find a location and schedule a court reporter online.

Texas shale oil boom shakes up Houston’s legal landscape with mergers, acquisitions, ‘poaching’

Houston's skyline. by J. Labrador via Flickr Creative Commons.

Houston’s skyline. by J. Labrador via Flickr Creative Commons.

Dallas-based Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr PC expanded its Houston office with eight lawyers from Houston-based Harrison Bettis McFarland LLP, which specializes in energy litigation, the Houston Business Journal reports.

Munsch Hardt intends to recruit more Houston attorneys before the end of the year, the story said, making it one of several law firms vying for a share of the Houston legal services market.

The boom in shale exploration has caused national and international law firms to look to Texas. Those firms are moving into Houston through mergers, acquisitions and, the Journal reports, “good old-fashioned poaching from Houston law firms.”

The shale boom refers to the Eagle Ford Shale, an underground oil formation that stretches 400 miles along the South Texas border, according to Connect2Houston.com.

Oil production has skyrocketed there from 340 barrels a day in 2009 to nearly one million barrels a day now. Oil production rose 600 percent at one point.

Read more on the Houston market.

Read more on Munsch Hardt.

Read more on Texas oil production.

Huseby in Houston
Huseby offices offer litigation services, including court reporting, Web conferencing, video conferencing, video depositions, and more. Huseby’s Southwest regional center is located at this Houston address:

2425 West Loop South Freeway #200
Houston, TX
(713) 650-3500

Dallas Ebola lawsuit unlikely because of tough Texas tort-reform measures

Mr. Duncan arrived at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport on Sept. 20. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

Mr. Duncan arrived at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport on Sept. 20.

There’s a legal angle to every story, and the case of the now deceased Ebola patient in Dallas, Texas is no exception.

Reuters reports no lawsuits appear to have been filed in connection with the case, but says possible legal claims could be brought by the family of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan who before he died was sent home from the hospital, anyone he may have exposed to the disease, or hospital workers put at risk.

But the odds aren’t good.

That’s because “Texas tort-reform measures have made it one of the hardest places in the United States to sue over medical errors, especially those that occurred in the emergency room,” plaintiffs’ lawyers and legal experts told Reuters.

Read more.

Huseby in Dallas
Huseby has conference room suites in Dallas ready for you to use today. Huseby offices offer litigation services, including court reporting, Web conferencing, video conferencing, video depositions, and more.

Our office in Dallas is at this location:
5956 Sherry Lane #1000
Dallas, TX 75225
(800) 333-2082

Looking for help in a different city? Call a Huseby scheduler and ask. We have more than 4,000 conference room suites worldwide ready for you to use today. 800-333-2082.

 

Huseby can help alleviate anticipated California court reporter shortage

NBC photo of Raymond Burr as Perry Mason via Wikimedia Commons.

NBC photo of Raymond Burr as Perry Mason via Wikimedia Commons.

Drawing on images of “Perry Mason,” the San Gabriel Valley Tribune in California writes about the growing demand for court reporters.

“The court reporter would invariably pause, tilt her head and raise an eyebrow when a particularly juicy detail surfaced.”

Whether or not that image resonates, it’s true that the demand for court reporters is expected to lead to a shortage and California. The data is based on the 2013-14 Court Reporting Industry Outlook Report.

The report says that by 2018 there will be 5,500 new court reporter jobs available in the U.S., and California will lead the way with a projected 2,320 job openings.

Read more.

Huseby is doing its part to serve California’s court reporting needs.  With locations in San Diego, Los Angeles, Fresno, San Francisco, Sacramento, Fairfield, Napa and Dixon, Huseby serves large swaths of California.

Our California locations are:

1919 Grand Ave., Suite 1F
San Diego, CA 92109

 

7815 North Palm Ave., suite 120
Fresno, CA., 93711

700 Webster Street
Fairfield, CA 94533

3550 Watt Avenue, Suite 140
Sacramento, CA 95821

1001 2nd Street, Suite 345
Napa, CA 94559

Dixon Professional Building
255 N. Lincoln Street, Suite H
Dixon, CA 95620

515 South Flower Street
Los Angeles, CA 90071
(213) 234-5540

 

505 Montgomery Street
10th & 11th floors
San Francisco, CA 94111
(415) 432-6051

If you are in these areas or anywhere in California, give us a call at 1-800-333-2082 to schedule services at any of our locations worldwide.

Or, click here to find a location and schedule a court reporter online.

Connecticut law firm launches new business accelerator in Hartford

Hartford, Connecticut law firm Cohn Birnbaum & Shea has launched its own business accelerator that will offer guidance and legal services to startup companies in exchange for equity stakes, according to Hartford Business.com.

Accelerators have become more popular among law firms in recent years, the story says, offering discounted office space and investing partners’ capital in startups they advise.

Huseby in Connecticut
Brandon Huseby Reporting & Video, also based in Hartford, has offices inBrandon Huseby Logo Hartford, Stamford and New Haven plus additional reporters elsewhere in in Connecticut, Rhode Island and New York, along withits 33 locations in 10 other states and the District of Columbia. Huseby Inc. is based in Charlotte, N.C.

Here are the locations for Brandon Huseby. Contact any of the offices directly or click here to schedule.

Hartford
249 Pearl Street
Hartford, Conn. 06103
(860) 549-1850

Stamford
Six Landmark Square
Stamford, Conn. 06901
(203) 316-8591

New Haven
900 Chapel Street
New Haven, Conn. 06510
(800) 852-4589

Accelerator in Hartford
According to Bloomberg Businessweek, accelerators aim to turn business ideas into prototypes or products that are ready for market in a matter of months. Sponsors provide initial funding and expertise to small groups that can demonstrate a sound product idea. In return, the sponsors take a small equity stake in the new business.

Accelerated Ventures LLC is  looking for a dozen startups to work with. The new venture is aimed at companies that aren’t yet ready to attract investors, HartfordBusiness.com reports.

Read more.

Court reporting roundup: Los Angeles faces shortfall; N.C. court threatens trial cancellations; Georgia reporters charged with theft

stenographThere’s a growing demand for court reporters in the United States, according to the 2013-14 Court Reporting Industry Outlook Report.

The report says that by 2018 there will be 5,500 new court reporter jobs available in the U.S. with the greatest demand occurring in California, Texas, Illinois and New York, according to the San Gabriel Valley Tribune. California leads the list with a projected 2,320 new job openings.

Los Angeles County court spokeswoman Mary Hearn told the Tribune the courts are aware that a shortfall may be coming.

“At the Los Angeles Superior Court, we recognize that the demographics of court reporting professionals suggest that there may be fewer reporters available in the future,” she said. “That concerns us because court-employed court reporters will continue to be an important service we offer to the public.”

Read more.

Court strain in North Carolina
In Charlotte, North Carolina, the court administrator has told attorneys they might have to pay for their own court reporters or their trials could be canceled, according to WBTV.com.

Mecklenburg County, N.C. currently has two court reporter openings which the administrator says he cannot fill because of lack of funding. Two experienced court reporters left this year, following a salary reduction.

It’s putting a strain on trial courts, the station reported..

Read more.

Georgia reporters accused of theft
Three Georgia court reporters are accused of stealing more than $485,000 by billing for pages that didn’t exist, according to AJC.com.

Investigators found three suspects were intentionally mis-formatting court records and receiving extra reimbursement, and believe the crimes date back to 2006.

The three turned themselves in and have been charged with theft by taking, theft by deception, giving false statements and racketeering.

Read more.

Illinois reporter honored
And finally, some good news.

Court reporter Amy B. Quint of Benton, Illinois was presented the Distinguished Service Award at the 2014 Illinois Court Reporters Association conference in Chicago.

The award was presented for her outstanding service to the court reporting profession during her 30-year career.

Read more.